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I feel low

What is low mood?

Find out more about low mood and why you might feel this way...

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What is low mood?
What is low mood?

What is low mood?

It's OK not to feel happy all the time, but if you're feeling sad most of the time it can be really hard to cope.

Everyone's mood goes up and down. Lots of different things can cause this, like hormones, life events, relationships and stress.

Low mood means that you are feeling sad, this could last for a short or long time and can affect your mind and body in different ways.

What can it feel like?

What can it feel like?

Low mood can feel different to different people. Some people might get upset and feel like crying, others might feel numb. When you are feeling low things that you usually enjoy can often seem less fun or enjoyable. 

Scroll down to see how low mood can sometimes feel in your mind and body. 

What can it look like?

What can it look like?

It’s not always easy to tell if someone close to you is feeling low. Sometimes it’s not even easy for you to understand what you’re feeling.

Some responses are:

  • getting annoyed easily or starting arguments
  • expressing lots of negative thoughts/opinions
  • not eating as much or eating a lot more than usual. 

 

You are not alone....

"I think it all started after my granddad died. I was really close to him and would usually go over to his house a couple of times a week. I could see how sad my mum was about it so I felt like I had to be strong at home and not show I was upset.

At school I didn’t want to talk about it and just wanted to forget that it had happened. As time went on, I started to feel worse and worse. I used to hang out with my friends every weekend but started staying in a lot more. Being on my own was the only time it felt ok to feel sad. I felt like I didn’t have control over anything and found to difficult to sleep.

A teacher at school that I get on with noticed that I was quieter than usual and that I was being pretty negative about everything in the lessons. Eventually I decided to tell them how I was feeling. I didn’t feel better straight away but they encouraged me to speak to my mum and think about bereavement support.

A year later and things are getting easier, I still feel sad sometimes about my granddad but I’m finding it easier to cope with the feelings."

- Sam, 14 

You are not alone....

Do I have a mental health condition? 

Although Sam’s low mood came about because of a loss, it’s important to remember that there may not always be an event like this that causes you to feel low.

We all feel low from time to time and it can be very normal to feel sad if something upsetting has happened.

Mental health conditions like depression are different to feelings of low mood that are related to an event.

Do I have a mental health condition? 

What's wrong with me?

For some people, low mood can really get in the way of them living a happy life. Do any of the following affect you? 

If you are feeling any of the above, it doesn’t mean that you are definitely affected by depression. It’s really important to go to your GP as soon as possible and seek support. If you are having suicidal thoughts or are worried about your safety you can call 999 in an emergency and someone will help you. 
If you are feeling any of the above, it doesn’t mean that you are definitely affected by depression. It’s really important to go to your GP as soon as possible and seek support. If you are having suicidal thoughts or are worried about your safety you can call 999 in an emergency and someone will help you. 
If you are feeling any of the above, it doesn’t mean that you are definitely affected by depression. It’s really important to go to your GP as soon as possible and seek support. If you are having suicidal thoughts or are worried about your safety you can call 999 in an emergency and someone will help you. 
If you are feeling any of the above, it doesn’t mean that you are definitely affected by depression. It’s really important to go to your GP as soon as possible and seek support. If you are having suicidal thoughts or are worried about your safety you can call 999 in an emergency and someone will help you. 
What can help?

What can help?

There are lots of different things you can try to and improve your mood. If these don't seem to help, it is always best to seek advice from your GP.

If you are worried about speaking to a doctor, the Doc Ready site can help you prepare for your appointment: https://www.docready.org

If you are experiencing depression, support can sometimes be given in the form medication, talking therapies or a combination of both.

Where are you on the low mood scale?

Pick a number on the scale to show much your low mood affects you.

Have a think about what might help make your number bigger and scroll through your prescription below to get some information and ideas about support.

How can I manage my low mood?

We've put together some resources on how to cope with feeling low. 

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How can I manage my low mood?
Step 1: Connect

Step 1: Connect

When you feel down it can feel easier to withdraw from seeing friends and family. Staying in touch with people and spending time with others can often help improve your mood. Try and think of a few trusted people in your life and plan time each week to see them or speak to them.

TIP: If you struggle to connect, try setting reminders on your phone to encourage you.

Swipe left to find Step 2!

Step 2: Look after your body

Step 2: Look after your body

It’s the only one you’ve got! If you feel low you may not feel like going outside much and you may want to eat a lot more or a lot less. Try and make sure that you eat some healthy food and spend some time outdoors. It can also be tempting to turn to drugs or alcohol to improve your mood. Although this might help at the time it can often make you feel worse. 

TIP: Start small by introducing one new, healthy food or spending 5 minutes a day outside.

Swipe left to find Step 3!

Step 3: Create your own wellbeing toolkit

Step 3: Create your own wellbeing toolkit

Make a list of things that could boost your mood that you can use when you’re feeling down.

e.g.

  • Go for a walk
  • Listen to music
  • Contact a friend
  • Write your feelings down
  • Play with a pet
Get Help

Get Help

If you feel that your low mood is getting in the way of your day to day life, it may be a good idea to get some help. Click here to find mental health support services in your area.

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